execution

The Marshall Project: A Lull in Executions

A few weeks ago we told the story of Vernon Madison and his long-winding journey on death row in Alabama. While his execution has been stayed momentarily, the United States finds itself in an interesting lull. As of yesterday, according to the Marshall Project, we’re in the middle of one of the longest gaps between executions in the past quarter century.

 

recents

SOURCE: Tom Meagher, “It’s Been Almost Two Months Since the U.S. Executed Someone,” June 30, 2016. The Marshall Project/The Next to Die

According to journalist Tom Meagher, the next set of executions are slated for July 14 — one in Texas and another in Georgia. Missouri conducted the most recent execution back on May 11 when the state killed Earl Forrest by lethal injection. That break in time will constitute a gap of 64 days. That’s a fairly long stoppage considering that executions had been happening at a pace of around two a month since the start of the year.

Vernon Madison and the Death Penalty

On April 18, 1985 Mobile County Police Officer Julian Schulte responded to a report of a missing child. Upon arriving at the home of Cheryl Ann Green, Schulte was informed that there had been a miscommunication — the child was not missing and was on her way home thanks to a family friend. While Schulte waited in his police car for a second unit to arrive at the home, an argument broke out between Ms. Green and her then-boyfriend Vernon Madison. Schulte intervened, requesting that Madison calm down and leave the residence. Madison left briefly, but returned shortly after with a gun and shot Officer Julian Schulte twice through the driver side window of his unmarked police vehicle. A week later, Corporal Julian Schulte — by all accounts a good officer and better person — was pronounced dead.

Two weeks ago on Thursday, May 12. Vernon Madison was supposed to die.

If someone were to make an argument against the death penalty, Vernon Madison may indeed be the poster child. Not because there’s ambiguity in the crime — he most certainly murdered Officer Julian Schulte — but because Madison’s story highlights so many of the flaws which come along with state-sanctioned executions.   (more…)